Tag Archive for online education

Another #HumanMOOC starts 11/14/16

On November 14th the course Humanizing Online Instruction: #HumanMOOC will begin again. I’m delighted to be working with Maha Al-Freih, Patrice Torcivia Prusko, and Matt Crosslin again on the course. This time we will be utilizing a new social learning discussion and curation tool called YellowDig and hope to gain some valuable insights into the…

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Gratitude for #dLRN15

I feel very privileged, humbled, and honored to have had the opportunity to attend the dLRN conference at Stanford University and to present some of the ideas and research that I’ve been working on with colleagues Maha Al-Freih, Joyce Seitzinger, Rebecca Hogue, Maha Bali, Autumm Caines, Jeffrey Keeler, Rolin Moe, and Matt Crosslin.  As an…

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Excerpt from: Course iteration as a reflective process

MOOC iteration as a reflective process: HumanMOOC In 2012, xMOOCs rose from the laboratories of computer scientists who brought a machine learning approach to education. These xMOOCs or instructivist MOOCs were best know for their re-creation of the lecture as video, computer graded assessments and very little to no interaction with the professor. While technology…

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Online Community Building

The development of an online community takes an investment of time and energy. I call this an investment because it does pay dividends through the sharing and collective knowledge of the crowd. In #HumanMOOC, we explored building a community of inquiry by focusing on presence (teaching, social, and cognitive) and Dr. Rena Palloff specifically talked…

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Faculty Satisfaction with Teaching Online

The demand for online courses has increased dramatically–so has the number of faculty teaching online. Online pedagogy has evolved over a short period of time, creating challenges with changing delivery methods, training, support, and course development. As faculty reflect on their experiences, are they satisfied teaching in the online format? Are they satisfied with the student…

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Triggering Events to Promote Cognitive Presence

As a part of the #HumanMOOC, Jim Groom, the director of teaching and learning technologies at the University of Mary Washington shares his story about how he has used triggering events in #DS106. We were thrilled to get to hear the story of the Summer of Oblivion.  It sounded like it was fun and when instructors…

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Synchronous vs Asynchronous Debate

On Sunday, March 22nd, I was joined by two brilliant ladies, Dr. Maha Bali and Dr. Peggy Semingson in a #HumanMOOC Google Hangout.  We discussed the affordances and limitations of technology specifically synchronous and asynchronous communications in online courses. Dr. Semingson makes some good points about the personal attention that can be given to an…

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Instructor Presence on #HumanMOOC with @drchuck

Tonight Robin Bartoletti and I had the honor of talking with Dr. Chuck Severance.  Dr. Severance shared some of his background and expertise in creating instructional videos that help establish instructor presence.  He is such a delight to talk to that it was hard to keep it to 30 minutes. Some of the participants in #HumanMOOC were tweeting:…

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Strategies for Providing Feedback in Online Courses

The video below is from The Center Moderator Michelle Pacansky-Brock discusses the power of the human voice (depth, warmth, and intonation) with two faculty who give feedback to their own students using video and voice.  They share their own processes for giving feedback in this manner. Hangout Archive from: The Center  Use Audio and Video Feedback.…

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Faculty Satisfaction Teaching Fully Online Courses

Posted July 5, 2013 on The Faculty Commons: The demand for online courses has increased dramatically–so has the number of faculty teaching online. Online pedagogy has evolved over a short period of time, creating challenges with changing delivery methods, training, support, and course development. As faculty reflect on their experiences, are they satisfied teaching in the…

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